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CHIMNEY CLEANING: A DO IT YOURSELF APPROACH

Maintaining your chimneys in Upper East Side, NY is very important. To have your chimney swept professionally, call Ageless Chimney. In preparation for the cleaning process, there are a few things you can do. In fact, you can keep your chimney clean by doing some simple things! Keep reading for a step-by-step at-home chimney cleaning guide.
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  1. Prepare the Area Around Your Chimney

First thing’s first. You should remove anything that is in front of your Upper East Side, NY fireplace. Also, move any furniture as far away as possible. If you don’t want anything getting dirty, make sure you cover everything with old sheets. You should also roll back any rugs that are near the fireplace. If you have carpeting, it would be wise to set down a tarp.

  1. Remove the Grate from the Fireplace

This may go without saying, but do not operate an open flame in the area surrounding the fireplace while attempting to do any chimney cleaning in New York County. Be sure to wear a dust mask and protective gloves while you attempt to clean the fireplace. While being mindful not to inhale any dust or soot, shovel out ashes and debris from the inside of the fireplace.

  1. Inspect Your Chimney

Use a torch, (carefully!) to look up the flue of the chimney. If there is a damper fitted to your flue, you will need to ensure it is open. If there is, use the damper handle to push the flap back and lock it open. Check for any animals or birds that may have taken up residence in your New York County chimney. Inspect for any cracks or missing firebricks and take remedial steps if the damage is found. The lining of your flue is important to prevent gas or smoke from escaping. Check the thickness of any creosote build-up using a blade or scraper. If you notice significant damage, it may be time to get some professional chimney cleaning company, or even chimney repair, with Ageless Chimney.



  1. Select Your Brush


By now you should have determined the size and shape of your New York County chimney flue. It will be either square or round. You should also estimate the height of your chimney. Once you choose the correct brush, attach it to a rod. Push the rod up the flue until the bottom end of the rod is in the middle of the fireplace.

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    1. Scrub, Scrub, Scrub!

    Start scrubbing up your chimney by going through the hole in your dust sheet or cardboard, attach another rod to lengthen your chimney brush. Scrub using a slight clockwise movement as you push, and never twist the brush counterclockwise. With a hard and vigorous thrust, scrub the flue with the brush, adding more rods as you proceed up the flue.

    1. Remove Brush and Soot

    You will know that you have reached the top of your chimney when you feel less friction. Withdraw the brush unscrewing one rod at a time. As you unscrew the last rod, let the brush fall into the soot pile that now lies at the bottom of the fireplace. Lift the bottom of the dust sheet or cardboard covering, remove the brush and carefully shovel the pile of soot into a metal bucket.

    1. Cleaning Up


    The first thing you should do is remove any dust cloths or cardboard that may have been assembled. It is now time to get the vacuum or shop vacuum out and clean up all that soot! To complete the project, you will need to assemble the fireplace’s grate once more. If you used an old sheet, you should take it outside and shake it off. As soot is non-toxic and environmentally friendly, it can be buried as a means of disposal. Hard deposits of creosote are corrosive and more toxic, however, they can be buried too. Any edible plants in your garden will not absorb creosote, and when you eat the fruit or vegetables they produce, they will not contain the chemicals present in creosote.

Call Us Today

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Getting your chimney swept and inspected improves the quality of the air in your home, keeps your loved ones safe from toxins, and reduces your home’s fire risk. Ageless Chimney takes pride in providing the safest, most cost-effective cleaning procedures. Call us today at 516-795-1313!

The Upper East Side, sometimes abbreviated UES, is a neighborhood in the borough of Manhattan in New York City, bounded by 96th Street to the north, the East River to the east, 59th Street to the south, and Central Park/Fifth Avenue to the west. The area incorporates several smaller neighborhoods, including Lenox Hill, Carnegie Hill, and Yorkville. Once known as the Silk Stocking District, it has long been one of the most affluent neighborhoods in New York City.

Before the arrival of Europeans, the mouths of streams that eroded gullies in the East River bluffs are conjectured to have been the sites of fishing camps used by the Lenape, whose controlled burns once a generation or so kept the dense canopy of oak-hickory forest open at ground level.

In the 19th century the farmland and market garden district of what was to be the Upper East Side was still traversed by the Boston Post Road and, from 1837, the New York and Harlem Railroad, which brought straggling commercial development around its one station in the neighborhood, at 86th Street, which became the heart of German Yorkville. The area was defined by the attractions of the bluff overlooking the East River, which ran without interruption from James William Beekman’s “Mount Pleasant”, north of the marshy squalor of Turtle Bay, to Gracie Mansion, north of which the land sloped steeply to the wetlands that separated this area from the suburban village of Harlem. Among the series of villas a Schermerhorn country house overlooked the river at the foot of present-day 73rd Street and another, Peter Schermerhorn’s at 66th Street, and the Riker homestead was similarly sited at the foot of 75th Street. By the mid-19th century the farmland had largely been subdivided, with the exception of the 150 acres (61 ha) of Jones’s Wood, stretching from 66th to 76th Streets and from the Old Post Road (Third Avenue) to the river and the farmland inherited by James Lenox, who divided it into blocks of houselots in the 1870s, built his Lenox Library on a Fifth Avenue lot at the farm’s south-west corner, and donated a full square block for the Presbyterian Hospital, between 70th and 71st Streets, and Madison and Park Avenues. At that time, along the Boston Post Road taverns stood at the mile-markers, Five-Mile House at 72nd Street and Six-Mile House at 97th, a New Yorker recalled in 1893.

Gracie Mansion, last remaining East River villa

The fashionable future of the narrow strip between Central Park and the railroad cut was established at the outset by the nature of its entrance, in the southwest corner, north of the Vanderbilt family’s favored stretch of Fifth Avenue from 50th to 59th Streets. A row of handsome townhouses was built on speculation by Mary Mason Jones, who owned the entire block bounded by 57th and 58th Streets and Fifth and Madison. In 1870 she occupied the prominent corner house at 57th and Fifth, though not in the isolation described by her niece, Edith Wharton, whose picture has been uncritically accepted as history, as Christopher Gray has pointed out.

Learn more about Upper East Side.

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