Chimney Sweep in Jackson Heights, NY 11372

Everything You Should Know About Fireplace Maintenance

Maintaining your fireplace in good working condition is essential, especially during the cold winter months in Jackson Heights, NY. If you don’t clean your chimney fireplace regularly, you risk developing more severe chimney issues that are difficult to resolve.

Regular maintenance is required for gas and wood-burning fireplaces, but the process is relatively simple once you get the hang. You’ll need to do various maintenance activities to keep your fireplace in good working order.

Based on the type of chimney fireplace, whether wood-burning or gas, you will determine how you maintain it. Maintaining a wood-burning fireplace necessitates more effort.

Homeowners are willing to put in the extra effort for an authentic fireplace experience because nothing compares to watching a pile of logs catch fire, listening to the crackling wood, and smelling the smoky scent of a real fire!

The actual fire goes out, but there’s still ash, soot, and burned wood scraps to clean up. On the other hand, a gas fireplace provides the warmth and coziness of an indoor fire with the flick of a switch. Simply flick the switch again and retire to your bed when you’ve had your fill.

It’s that simple to light a gas fireplace, but regular chimney sweep and maintenance in Jackson Heights, NY is still required to keep your unit clean and safe. Let’s look at the fireplace maintenance requirements for both types of fireplaces.

1) Wood-Burning Fireplaces

Traditional wood-burning fireplaces will necessitate more maintenance than gas fireplaces. To avoid buildup, you’ll need to clean your fireplace and the surrounding area after each fire. You’ll need to wait about 12 hours after each fire for everything to cool down before sweeping away any remaining ash and debris.

Creosote blockage is another concern for fireplace owners in Jackson Heights, NY. Creosote is a byproduct of wood-burning fires that can cause respiratory problems and pose a fire hazard.

A limited portion of creosote can be removed by yourself, but more significant amounts will have to be eliminated by fireplace maintenance professionals in Queens County. Commercially available chimney cleaning products, such as liquids, powders, and even particular cleaning logs, can be used to remove small amounts of creosote.

You should also be aware of the type of wood you’re burning. More smoke and creosote buildup will result from too new or wet wood. Ensure your wood is completely dry and seasoned to ensure a consistent burn.

2) Gas-Burning Fireplace

Gas fireplaces are popular among homeowners because they are low-maintenance. That isn’t to say you should ignore your gas fireplace entirely. In a gas-burning fireplace, dust and debris can still accumulate, significantly harming your fireplace.

In most cases, a microfiber cloth and a handheld vacuum will be enough to clean the inside of your fireplace. If your fireplace has a glass insert, you’ll want a particular fireplace maintenance specialist to provide a better service.

Jackson Heights, NY

It’s also crucial to inspect your fireplace for other issues by hiring chimney inspection professionals in Jackson Heights, NY. Rust, peeling paint, and strange odors may not appear dangerous now, but they can lead to serious safety issues if left unattended.

How To Plan Routine Chimney Maintenance?

Chimney inspection and cleaning are essential stages of a fireplace maintenance plan. You should clean and maintain your fireplace on your own. You should also schedule professional chimney cleaning and maintenance tasks in Jackson Heights, NY, by planning to obtain affordable services.

Chimney inspections are feasible to ensure that your chimney and fireplace are in good working order and no safety or structural issues.

When a chimney is inspected regularly, you can often detect deterioration such as masonry damage before it causes significant damage such as leaks or odors.

After chimney inspection, if the professional finds a blockage or any other problem in a chimney, they should perform a chimney cleaning process.

Chimney cleaning experts sweep your fireplace from bottom to top for the best results and dust control. Chimney cleaning eliminates soot from the firebox, flue liner, smoke chamber, damper, and smoke shelf. Soot and creosote buildup inside a chimney flue reduces the flow of the fireplace and increases the risk of a chimney fire if not cleaned.

When you aren’t using your fireplace as much during the summer, you should schedule an appointment with a chimney sweep professional near me in Jackson Heights, NY like Ageless Chimney.

A fireplace sweeping professional in Queens County will remove any creosote buildup that you cannot eliminate yourself and inspect the chimney for any other issues that need to be addressed.

You’ll have more time to make any chimney repair work if you schedule this fireplace maintenance during the summer. Maintaining your fireplace chimney in Jackson Heights, NY is the best way to prevent severe problems in the future.

Hire CSIA Certified Fireplace Maintenance Company Like Ageless Chimney In Jackson Heights, NY

A secured fireplace chimney is kept clean, and at Ageless Chimney in Jackson Heights, NY, we’ll ensure your fireplace is safe and efficient as much as possible. We are certified by Chimney Safety Institute of America, a rigorous industry certification held by only the best chimney sweep experts in Jackson Heights, NY.

We remove flammable creosote from chimney flues at Ageless Chimney in Jackson Heights, NY, to reduce the risk of a chimney fire. Our chimney sweeps professionals near me in Queens County also clear debris and obstructions that could obstruct smoke and carbon monoxide.

Ageless Chimney provides maintenance, fireplace sweeping, and repair service in the Jackson Heights, NY areas. Count on us for chimney sweep cleaning, chimney repair, chimney rebuilding, and chimney inspection whenever these services are required. Please contact us at 516-613-5450 to make an appointment.


Some information about Jackson Heights, NY

Jackson Heights is a neighborhood in the northwestern portion of the borough of Queens in New York City. Jackson Heights is neighbored by North Corona to the east, Elmhurst to the south, Woodside to the west, northern Astoria (Ditmars-Steinway) to the northwest, and East Elmhurst to the northeast. Jackson Heights has an ethnically diverse community, with half the population having been foreign-born since the 2000s. According to the 2010 United States Census, the neighborhood has a population of 108,152.

From colonial times to the 1900s, the area now known as Jackson Heights was a vast marsh named Trains Meadow. Urbanization at the turn of the century was creating a New York City housing shortage and urban sprawl. In 1909, Edward A. MacDougall’s Queensboro Corporation bought 325 acres (132 ha) of undeveloped land and farms and christened them Jackson Heights after John C. Jackson, a descendant of one of the original Queens families and a respected Queens County entrepreneur. Northern Boulevard, a major thoroughfare that bisects the neighborhood, was also originally named Jackson Avenue; the name of this road is still retained in a short stretch between Queens Plaza and Queens–Midtown Tunnel in Long Island City. Though the land was not especially known for its elevation, the addition of the term ‘Heights’ echoed the prestige of the neighborhood of Brooklyn Heights and indicated that Jackson Heights was meant to be an exclusive neighborhood. At that time the area could most easily be reached via a ferry from Manhattan or the Brooklyn Bridge; more direct access came with the Queensboro Bridge in 1909, followed by the elevated IRT Flushing Line—the present-day 7 train, just 20 minutes from Midtown Manhattan—in 1917, and the Fifth Avenue Coach Company double-decker coaches in 1922.

Jackson Heights was conceived as a planned development for middle- to upper-middle income workers looking to escape an overcrowded Manhattan. Inspired by Sir Ebenezer Howard’s garden city movement, it was laid out by Edward MacDougall’s Queensboro Corporation in 1916 and began attracting residents after the arrival of the Flushing Line in 1917. The Queensboro Corporation coined the name ‘garden apartment’ to convey the concept of apartments built around private parks. Although land for churches was provided, the apartments themselves were limited to White Anglo-Saxon Protestants, excluding Jews, Blacks, and perhaps Greeks and Italians.

Several of the buildings in Jackson Heights were built by the Queensboro Corporation as part of a planned community located a few blocks off of the Flushing Line between Northern Boulevard and 37th Avenue. Targeted toward the middle class, these multi-story apartment buildings designed in the Colonial Revival and neo-Tudor styles were based on similar ones in Berlin. They were to share garden spaces, have ornate exteriors and features such as fireplaces, parquet floors, sun rooms, and built-in bathtubs with showers; and be cooperatively owned. In addition, the corporation divided the land into blocks and building lots, as well as installed streets, sidewalks, and power, water, and sewage lines. The Laurel apartment building on 82nd Street at Northern Boulevard was the first of the Queensboro Corporation buildings in Jackson Heights, completed in 1914 with a small courtyard. The Greystones on either side of 80th Street between 37th and 35th avenues were completed in 1918 with a design by architect George H. Wells. There was leftover unused space, which was converted to parks, gardens, and recreational areas, including a golf course; much of this leftover space, including the golf course, no longer exists. This was followed by the 1919 construction of the Andrew J. Thomas–designed Linden Court, a 10-building complex between 84th Street, 85th Street, 37th Avenue, and Roosevelt Avenue. The two sets of 5 buildings each, separated by a gated garden with linden trees and two pathways, included parking spaces with single-story garages accessed via narrow driveways, the first Jackson Heights development to do so; gaps at regular intervals in the perimeter wall; a layout that provided light and ventilation to the apartments, as well as fostered a sense of belonging to a community; the area’s first co-op; and now-prevalent private gardens surrounded by the building blocks.

Learn more about Jackson Heights.

Map of Jackson Heights, NY


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